Great Mountain Forest

Last weekend we took the general entomology class to the Yale Camp at the Great Mountain Forest in Norfolk, CT. We joined up with the general entomology class from Yale. Dave likes to plan this trip every time he teaches the course. Not only do the students catch a lot of insects, but it allows for good class bonding time, since we encourage a lot of interaction during the lab portion of the course.

Even though there was a severe storm Saturday afternoon, we were able to make the most of our time there. Lots of blacklighting Friday night, a late night caterpillar walk, sorting and pinning specimens, quizzing the students to help them study, lounging by the fireplace, insect charades, and staying up late gossiping. Some people left Saturday night, some left early Sunday, and some of us went for a beautiful morning hike. I caught about a dozen Acronicta caterpillars on red and white oak – really important for my research. So I was quite pleased.

Here are a few pictures from the weekend… check out our class flickr page for more.

Dave giving a lecture on caterpillars.

At one of the many blacklighting set-ups we had going. Lots of insects, and lots of red efts that came to eat them!

Aquatic collecting.

Two of my little Acronicta caterpillars. Aren’t they adorable?

The biggest caterpillar you will ever see in the northeast – Hyalophora cecropia. He spun his cocoon the next day.

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Posted on September 14, 2012, in General Entomology, Invertebrates, Lepidoptera. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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