Joe pupates

Joe Acronicta had had enough of us poking and prodding him, and decided to pupate.

I know that most Acronicta species pupate by tunneling into soft, dead wood. But usually this is a shallow groove, covered by bits of wood and silk. Sometimes they burrow in deeper, but you can see the hole behind them.

Joe decided to be a bit like some other Acronictines (species in different genera, but still closely related to Acronicta). Genera like Comachara, Polygrammate, and Harrisimemna all dig deep tunnels into wood. Then they crawl out and back into the tunnel rear-end first, sealing up the entrance with silk and bits of wood.

That’s exactly what Joe did.

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Joe, diligently digging his tunnel. blog_3

The pile of chewed wood left behind.blog_4

The cleverly disguised entrance.

I’m not sure how long it will be before he emerges, maybe a few weeks or months? When caterpillars pupate early in the season, it usually (but not always) means they will emerge in time to start another brood before cold weather arrives. If they pupate late in the season, they will usually (but not always) overwinter as a pupa.

While we are pretty sure that we have these caterpillars matched up with the correct adult, we are excited to have an adult emerge so we are 100% sure. I’ll post pictures when Joe makes his appearance as a moth!

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Posted on April 30, 2013, in Acronicta, Acronictinae, Invertebrates, Lepidoptera, Noctuidae and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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