Happy egg dance

On Saturday night I joined a bunch of entomologists for the 5th Annual Moth Ball in Massachusetts. Lights, sheets, cameras, beer, hotdogs, snacks, and tents for staying overnight. What could be better?

I was also on a mission. One species my advisor has been telling me I need to get ahold of is Acronicta hastulifera. As an adult it is nearly indistinguishable from Acronicta dactylina, though their caterpillars are quite different. The best way to make an ID, then, would be to catch a caterpillar and rear it to adulthood, or to get eggs from a female and raise the caterpillars. This is not always easy to do.

I found a few Acronicta females at the moth ball, nothing terribly exciting. Though it wasn’t long before a friend of mine approached with the grand prize in his hands (from a nearby sheet): Acronicta hastulifera. A big fat female! Success! The rest of the night paled in comparison to that moment.

When I awoke in my tent the next morning (after only a few hours of sleep), the first thing I did was check her container for eggs. About a dozen big green eggs dotted the sides of the vial. Woohoo! Last night I set her up in a larger container, and she really let loose. I estimate 200+ eggs.

hastulifera (1)

Momma moth and some of her eggs.

hastulifera (2) copy

So many eggs! My favorite colors, too!

At first I was a little worried that all of the eggs were remaining green. With other species that is sometimes a sign they are infertile. But once they gain some spots and other coloration, you know the larva is developing inside. Like this:

hastulifera (3) copy

A close-up, taken with my little Canon Powershot through a dissecting scope eyepiece.

I hadn’t seen a spot pattern quite like that before (the things on top are the mother’s scales).

hastulifera (4) copy

Some of the freshly laid eggs, before gaining their spots.

Now I must be patient and wait for them to hatch. Most Acronicta eggs take five or six days. I’ll be ready with some Alder (their favorite food), and my camera to get pics of the little ones.

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Posted on June 24, 2013, in Acronicta, Acronictinae, Black lighting, Invertebrates, Lepidoptera, Noctuidae and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Congratulations. You’ll soon be a Mom, or at least a stepmother.

  1. Pingback: Babies everywhere | caterpillarblog

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